Tag Archives: Obama

Post-election thoughts: Or, what a difference 8 years makes

Last night was a HUGE night for Democrats, and I would argue, a significant night for human rights.  Obama was reelected for another term, which means the infamous ‘Obamacare’ isn’t going away any time soon — so people who are in need of assistance with health care can still count on that (and now that I’m mostly-Canadian, I see access to health care as a human right).

Other big human rights wins from last night:

So, all in all, a good night! That said, I think there are many people back home who aren’t as giddy as I am after watching the President accept another term in office:

So this last half of my post is to whoever is out there in my life who reads my blog, and counts himself or herself as a Romney supporter: I know how you feel — why? Because I felt something similar only 8 years ago.

One thing about having this blog for as long as I have? In some ways, it’s a living record of who I am. Granted, in the last few years since becoming a mama, and working full-time, I haven’t been quite as active one here — but going back into the archives of this blog can be a pretty cool exercise in remembering who I was, years ago.

I dug back into the November archives and found this entry I wrote right after the 2004 presidential election was called for George W. Bush. Here are some excerpts from what I wrote:

Dejected. Deflated. Despondent.

[...]

I cannot believe Bush won. Cannot. believe.

I’m terrified.

Not only is he in charge of the Executive branch, but there’s majorities in the House and Senate now. With 3-4 justices retiring within the next term (possibly) — I’m picturing an even more police state than there is now.

[...] UPDATE: Well. Ohio could still be up in the air. Who knows?

Sound familiar?  Replace the odd word or two, and you’ll hear similar murmurings from GOP friends (eh-hem, well, those of them who haven’t unfriended you — I lost a friend last night who didn’t like what I was posting on Facebook, apparently).

Thing is, I know what you’re going through!  I was in just the same place as you are, only 8 years ago.

It’s kind of fascinating, in a way.

Anyway, dear GOP friend (or father) of mine, I hope that you’ll soon get over your feelings of dejectedness. And I mean it, sincerely. I know what it feels like, and it’s just no fun.  Hang in there, and hopefully, with time, we can progress to feeling more like this:

(found via Facebook)

 

4 more years.

It’s the most wonderful (political) season of the year

Watch:

I’m fascinated. And, horrified.

I would like to think that if someone were to put a camera in my face and ask me these questions regarding the candidate that I support, I would have an actual answer for them.

The cynic in my keeps thinking that the main reason why these people are so anti-Obama has more to do with the color of his skin than the positions he takes on the issues.

I’m looking forward to November 7th, when I  have the right person back in office for the second term.

Failing the midterms

So last night was a bit of a bomb for the Democratic party (and, I’d argue, the well-being of the entire country).   The GOP (read: Tea Party Party) took over control of the House of Representatives, though thankfully didn’t take over control of the Senate.  Also, thankfully, Harry Reid didn’t lose to Sharrrrrrron Angle in his district, which would have made the Repub gloating all the worse on the day-after media circuit.

While I’m disappointed in the results, I’m not that surprised or that dismayed.  While it’s going to be PAINFUL to have to watch John Boehner as Speaker of the House, I don’t think the GOP can inflict much damage in their majority capacity.

If anything, it will be interesting to see how the Republican party will have to step up to actually get something done for a change — rather than all the childish, slamming of feet, saying “NO!” that they’ve accomplished during the last 2 years.

I love how, last night in his “victory” speech, Boehner said that it’s now time for him to “roll up his sleeves” and get some work done in the House.  If only he had that attitude for the last 20 years he’s served as a Representative.

Stay tuned, this political ride is going to get bumpy, methinks.

Enough of the Hitler referencing.

Oy, if I hear someone else break out ye ol reductio ad Hitlerum argument one more time, I’m going to scream.  An old Mediaite post reminded me of this soundbite from Robert Gibbs (who I still haven’t forgiven for the “professional left” remark):

You hear — in this [healthcare] debate you hear analogies, you hear references to, you see pictures about and depictions of individuals that are truly stunning. And you hear it all the time. People — imagine five years ago somebody comparing health care reform to 9/11. Imagine just a few years ago had somebody walked around with images of Hitler. Hopefully we can get back to a discussion about the issues that are important in this country, that we can do without being personally disagreeable and set up comparisons to things that were so insidious in our history that anybody in any professional walk of life would be well advised to compare nothing to those atrocities.

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It gets better

Adding his voice to Dan Savage’s campaign of “It Gets Better,” here’s President Obama:

My frustrations are pretty clear in the post below this one — but I think Rachel Maddow summed up the significance of the video well:

Americans who care about the rights of sexual minorities have plenty of reasons to be frustrated and even angry with President Obama and his administration. Still, I’m trying to think of another American president who could have given this talk — and it is a talk, not a speech. This is a president, a father, talking to kids the same age as his daughters. President Lincoln in the YouTube age? President Clinton, plus 15 years? In a time when progress feels painfully slow, this counts.

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What she said:

The ostensibly principled position these folks are taking is that they want smaller government.  They want government to do less.  And just because so many of them are retired Medicare and Social Security recipients who get to their protests in national parks via public mass transit, don‘t let that get in the way of their anti-government message.

When you are shown to demonstrably not believe something you say you believe, that‘s hypocrisy.  And reasonably speaking, it should undermine your claim that you‘re acting on principle.  You can‘t say you hate government-run health care, for example, and then profess your love for Medicare.  It is one or the other.  Or you don‘t make any sense.

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